Ep. 17 | How to Make an Extension Cord Organizer

Earlier this week, my uncle's neighbor gave me a wood burning kit. I've always wanted to try wood burning, but I've never had a kit to do so. I grabbed a piece of 1/4" thick poplar and cut a circle on it over at my scroll saw. After sanding it smooth, I brought it inside the house (where it's actually warm) and started to draw my design. I just penciled in a snowman and the words Merry Christmas. I didn't have any wood burning experience prior to this, so I made the design simple. I let the tool heat up for a few minutes and began tracing the pattern. There were a few spots I got hung up on, but I think the ornament came out pretty good for my first try. After I was done, I drilled a small hole in the top and finished the wood with some wipe-on polyurethane. This helped bring out the design in the wood and gave it a finished look. Just add some string in the top hole and it was all ready to hang up on the tree!

Ep. 5 | Make a Small Folding Picture Frame

This week I got back from vacation and I didn't have enough time for a project. I thought it would be a good chance to show you how I make free wood filler. Simply add wood glue and take all the fine sawdust from your sander and push the sawdust into the cracks until the fine dust fills in the holes and dries out the glue. The best part about this wood filler is the filler matches the wood since it's the sawdust from sanding the wood. The important thing to remember when making the filler is to use the very fine sawdust from a sander and not sawdust from a miter saw or table saw (that sawdust is too big and won't work as well).

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 30 | How to Make a Hockey Stickhandling Trainer

Ep. 36 | How to Make a Spline Jig

This week my neighbor gave me a chunk of cherry (same neighbor who gave me the poplar blank). I knew I wanted to turn something with this piece of wood, but I wasn't sure what. To be honest, I don't even know how I came up with this idea, but it just came to me! It seems like whenever I turn something on my lathe, I just start turning without a real game plan. I knew I wanted a shape that resembled a bowling ball, but instead of a pin shaped top, I wanted it to flare out. Once I was all done turning, I sanded the vase when it was still on the lathe (my favorite type of sanding). Once sanded, I put some wipe-on polyurethane. Simply drill a hole in the top of the vase and stick a few flowers in it and I think it gives it a nice look. I really like the way cherry looks when it's finished.

This was something I've seen a lot. People constantly making claims that coffee could stain wood. Well I had to put it to the test, so I decided to take you guys along with me.  I brewed a cup of coffee (no cream or sugar). I let it cool to room temperature and then I applied it to a piece of oak. When initially applied, I realized it did darken up a little. However, after it dried the color was gone and it left my stock with the grain slightly raised. I decided coffee isn't the best stain, but it's possible you could get a darker color if you brewed up a stronger cup of coffee. It's honestly up to you if you want to use it as stain. Personally, I wouldn't use it as stain, but that doesn't mean you can't!

This week I made this crate out of some scrap 2x4's in my workshop. The inspiration for this project came to me when I was shooting pucks in my driveway. When I was all done shooting I needed a place to put all of my pucks. I was originally going to buy a milk crate to throw them in, but then it came to me! I thought this would be  a great project not only for me, but for my show! I split 2x4's in half over at my table saw and cut them to size. After that, I just glued and stapled them together. I thought it was missing something, so I added the word "pucks" on the side using Steve Ramsey's inkjet printer to wood technique. If you would like to see his video on that click the link below!

In part 2 of 2, I unclamped the second glue up and sanded it smooth. When you decide to make a cutting board, you should buy a decent sander before otherwise you will be there forever. Now don't get me wrong, sanding a cutting board with a good sander still takes a long time, but it will help shorten the process. I would recommend using a belt sander to start out and switching to a random orbital sander for the final sanding. End grain wood takes a long time to sand, so don't say I didn't warn you! After all the sanding was done, I rounded over the top of the board over at my router table. To finish this project, you want to use a food-safe finish. I picked up some at my local hardware store that was made specifically for cutting boards. I've also heard people use mineral oil or vegetable oil.

Ep. 27 | How to Build a Wood Go Kart Part 1 of 3

Ep. 9 | How to Make an End Grain Cutting Board: 1 of 2

Ep. 22 | How to Make a Dirt Bike Stand

This week I didn't have a whole lot of time for a project, so I threw together this little wine holder. Making this project is pretty simple, start off by ripping the wood down to a reasonable width (I think I did 3"). After that, cut a 45 degree angle on both ends. I then drilled out a 1" hole for the bottleneck to go. Give the board a nice sanding and add on a finish of your choosing. I used wipe-on polyurethane and it really brought out the grain in the wood. This is a great stocking-stuffer project and you can make a lot of them in a short amount of time. Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

This week I'm finishing up the go kart build by adding a fishing boat seat I found at Wal-Mart and going over how I made the entire cart. If you guys have any questions, feel free to contact me by using the contact form on the upper-right side of the page. Thanks for sticking with me through this build and you can see the go kart in action at the end of this video!! I had a lot of fun making this project and hopefully you guys enjoyed watching it come to life.

Ep. 12 | How to Build a Workbench | Take 2

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 35 | The Easiest Way to Square Up Lumber

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 37 | How to Wood Burn a Christmas Ornament

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Steve Ramsey's Drill Press Table Video

Ep. 28 | How to Build a Wood Go Kart Part 2 of 3

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Drill Guides for Knobs

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Mini Stick Goalie

Regulation Size Goalie

Ep. 3 | How to Build Simple Wood Knobs

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 25 | Turning a Magic Wand out of Wood

Over the course of this week and next week, I am making an end grain cutting board. Typically you will use 2 types of wood to create a lot of contrast. I personally used maple and oak, but I would've preferred walnut and maple. In part 1 of 2, I cut the boards to size and glued them together. After it dried, I sanded the board flat and cut it into many pieces again. Once again I glue it back up and waited for it to dry. Learn how to finish it on part 2 of 2.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 33 | How to Make a Fancy Finger Joint Box | 2 of 2

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

My friends and I enjoy playing wiffle ball in the backyard all the time. Unfortunately, the stores only sell rubber bases. All they do is rip and tear after a few times of being stepped on. I decided it was time to get in the shop and build some bases. These are not only extremely simple to make, but they are very sturdy and you don't have to worry about them ripping. All the bases are made from 3/4" particle board and are 12"x12". I made home plate about 15"x15" and cut a point on one half of the board. I gave all the boards a quick sanding, but I didn't have time to paint them. I plan on painting them white like real baseball bases.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Steve Ramsey's Ink Jet Printer Technique

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 19 | How to Build a Miter Saw Sled

Ep. 6 | How to Make an iPhone Stand

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 1 | How to Build a Drill Press Table

My 2nd annual shop tour!

This week I'm back on the lathe with a chunk of red oak. I have always wanted a wand for my magic kit, but I'm too cheap to buy myself one! I had a piece of 2"x2" red oak left from a night stand I built before I started the show. I chucked it up on the lathe and started to turn a cylinder. I was worried about breaking the wood once it started getting really thin, because I've already spent so much time getting it to that point. Make sure your tools are sharp and everything should go smooth. Once I had the cylinder turned, I measured about 2 1/2" in on each side and made some notches to resemble the white tips. After sanding and adding wipe-on polyurethane, I cut the wand to size over at the bandsaw. Don't forget to add some finish on the end of the cut off tips and you can start your magic tricks!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

SketchUp Model
​Parts List

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this weeks Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 39 | 2014 Year End Wrap Up

This week I'm making a dirt bike stand for my little 50cc dirt bike. Even though this is a small dirt bike, it can easily be used for a full sized dirt bike. This stand was made from scrap 2x4's and a small piece of particle board that is 3/4" thick. I used the standard dirt bike stand design and this thing is extremely solid. My friend put his 250cc dirt bike on this and it didn't even budge. I plan on painting the stand black to hide oil and gas spills. This stand is secured tight with wood glue and screws and is great for any dirt bike owner that can't afford a metal stand.

Earlier this week, my neighbor gave me a chunk of poplar and I decided to turn it on the lathe. I didn't really have a plan before I went into this turning, I just removed different areas of wood that I felt needed to be removed. I really enjoy turning wood on my lathe every now and then because it is a more relaxing form of woodworking. You don't have to worry about tight miters or getting the perfect finger joints, you just keep on turning. Anyway, when finishing projects that are going to be around food, I always use a food safe finish. A few weeks back I made a cutting board and I just used some of the leftover finish for this roller.

Ep. 20 | How to Make a Set of Baseball Bases

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Steve Good's Website

Ep. 24 | How to Make Free Wood Filler

This week I made a sanding organizer station help keep my sand paper and sanders in order. This was all made from some 3/4" pine boards that were around 14" wide. By adding shelves in the bottom section, you can organize your sandpaper by grit and size. This is a really handy organizer for people who have a lot of sandpaper in their shops.

Ep. 31 | How to Build a Wood Bike Stand

After dealing with tangle up extension cords, I quickly became fed up with it. I decided I needed to take action! I wasn't going to spend money on some plastic extension cord organizer, I was going to make my own! I made this out of 3/4" particle board and simply drew what I wanted it to look like directly on the board. You can either cut out the shape on a bandsaw or with a jigsaw. You can apply paint if you would like, or you can leave it as is. This extension cord organizer holds a 100ft extension cord and it keeps it tangle free. I know I will be making more of these in the future!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Steve Ramsey's Garden Bench (Original Creator)

I decided to trash my 4'x8' workbench for a much smaller 4'x4' workbench. I made the bottom shelf extremely low to the ground to increase storage space and I have to say I like it a lot better then all of my other workbenches. It gives me a lot of room for storage underneath and It could probably be a great spot for somebody with a cnc machine. This workbench is extremely sturdy because of the doubled up 2x4 leg design and is easy to move around the shop with the caster wheels on the bottom. I would highly recommend this workbench for anyone with a workshop!

This week I used the last of my scrap maple to make a rustic bottle opener. I saw this originally on Pinterest and thought it would be a fairly simple project. This was a really quick build, but I think it has a nice look. I started by sketching the handle on a small piece of 3/4" maple. From here I went to the scroll saw and cut out the handle. After that, I used sandpaper to help shape the handle for a more comfortable grip. Once that was done, I drilled a hole in the top for the nail to go. I added some epoxy and hammer the nail in. I then went over to my vise and bent the nail to the correct shape.

After building the go kart for the past 3 weeks, I didn't have a lot of energy left. That's why this week I built this simple stickhandling training aid. I see these all over the internet on hockey websites and they sell for around $34.95. You haven't even heard the worst part, they're plastic! How is a plastic training aid going to stand up against a hockey puck. I can tell you right now, they won't. That's why I made my own out of wood. Wood can easily handle getting hit by a hockey puck and all the other abuses that come with it. I simply cut a 2x4 to the size I felt was right and then I cut 2 pieces of 2x4 down to 3 1/2". This made 2 squares and I screwed 1 square to each end. I added some paint to dress it up a bit and it was ready for use.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

SketchUp Model
​Parts List

In part 2 of 3, I installed the pillow blocks, the rear axle, the sprocket, the drum brake, the locking collars, explained the front wheel assembly, and mounted the engine. By the end of this video, I was able to have the engine power the go kart, but it didn't have a seat so it was very hard to steer (it didn't stop me from trying). I will see you guys next week for the 3rd and final part!

Ep. 34 | Woodworking Nut's 2014 Trailer

This week I received some hinges for saw horses. I simply had to slide some 2x4's into place and screw them together. These saw horses work great, but I didn't keep them too long. I just didn't have room in my shop, even though they fold up. I don't really need saw horses when I have workbenches. I would recommend these for somebody who doesn't have a permanent workshop. They are easy to fold up, but they I just feel like they aren't practical for my shop.

This week I'm back in the shop and I'm showing you guys how to square up a board. My neighbor gave me some walnut boards, all I need to do is square them up and they will be all set to go. The boards are about an 1" thick and the length and width vary in size. Since I don't have a jointer, I was afraid this would be difficult. First, I set up a straight edge along one end of the board. I ran my circular saw along the edge and made one straight edge to the board. I then brought the board over to the table saw and squared it up. I took my speed square and the board was true on every side. This worked perfectly and all there's left to do is run it through the planer. I hope this helps anyone who doesn't know how to true up a board.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

2014 is already over?! Thank you guys for another great year and I can't wait for 2015! You guys absolutely destroyed the subscriber count this year and I couldn't thank you enough!


Subscribers at Beginning of Season 2: 477


Subscribers at End of Season 2: 7,220


Total Gained: 6,743


This week I'm making a holder for your reading glasses or sunglasses. I found this on Steve Good's website The Scroll Saw Workshop. I've done a few projects off of his website in the past. I used 3/4" cherry for the entire project and really like the way it came out. You can download the template in the link above and make your own holder. I finished the project off with spray lacquer and I think it came out really nice. I'm not sure if I'm going to keep it or give it away, but I'm really proud of how it came out. This is a project where you can use a really nice piece of wood for because it doesn't require a whole lot of wood. Thanks for watching and I will see you guys next week with a special project!

Ep. 29 | How to Build a Wood Go Kart Part 3 of 3

This week I made this marking gauge for my workshop. It is made out of some maple scrap wood I had laying around the shop. First I cut out the long piece, which is 12" long and around 3/4" x 3/4" wide. I rounded over the edges on my router table and then I started cutting out the square piece. After that, I cut out the center for the long piece to go and rounded over the outside of the square. Once the square was cut out, I drilled a hole in the top for the bolt to lock the gauge in place. In order for the gauge to make a mark, I screwed in a small screw at one end of the rod. From here, I threaded the hand bolt into the piece and called it quits. I don't really use a marking gauge that much in my shop, but when I do, it will come in handy!

Ep. 18 | Building a Garden Bench | Steve's Design

After just purchasing a table saw, I wanted to do a project that helped showcased it. For this project I used 3/4" particle board and part of a 2x4. The first thing I did was made runners for the table saw tracks. I then attached those to the particle board with glue and wood screws. I then cut the board in half and added each 2x4 piece on a 45 degree angle. I glued and screwed those on and now it's ready to use!

I was looking to build a garden bench for my mom, but I couldn't find any reasonable designs online. I soon realized Steve Ramsey ​had already designed exactly what I was looking for. There was no reason to redesign a new bench, so I just made his. This bench was pretty cheap to make and I think it came out really nice. If you would like to see Steve's version, simply click the link below!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

After building a brand new workbench last week, I didn't have place to put my bandsaw anymore. This lead me to make a bandsaw cabinet with an area for storage below. This cabinet is made out of 3/4" particle board which is held together by pocket hole screws. On the bottom, I added a few scraps of 2x4's to screw the casters into. I added the casters to the bottom of this cabinet to make it easy to move around the shop. I really like having my tools on casters because it makes them so easy to move around my shop when I'm working. I think anyone with a smaller shop should put all of their tools on casters because it makes it so much easier to arrange the shop for different projects. After the cabinet was all done, I bolted the bandsaw down to the top and in the cabinet area below, I added my spare bandsaw blades.

Ep. 21 | Turning a Wood Flower Vase

Ep. 15 | How to Build a Wood Craft out of 2x4's

Ep. 16 |How to Make Simple Folding Sawhorses 

Ep. 26 | How to Make a Wood Holder for your Glasses

Today I'm going to be making this spline jig for my table saw. I'm planning on making multiple frames and since I don't have a spline jig, I thought it would be a good opportunity to show you guys how I went about building mine. A spline is a small piece of wood that goes in the corners of a picture frame and it tremendously increases the strength of the miter joint. I made my jig out of 3/4" particle board and a few wood screws. I started out by making a box, but only 3 sides instead. On the outside of the box, I added 2 strips on a 45 degree angle. When placed correctly, it should make a perfect 90 degree angle. Run it through the table saw and you're all set.

Note: Make sure your table saw fence is square to the blade, otherwise your splines won't be square.


Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 14 | Turning a Simple Rolling Pin

2014 Channel Trailer!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

This week I made this small folding picture frame to pay tribute to my guinea pig Chainsaw who died this week. I used some 1/4" thick red oak that I had laying around the shop. I cut out the center circles with my scroll saw, and routed out the back side on my router table. After I glued it up, I added some trim around the outside to dress it up. From here, you can add some clear coat to finish it all up!

My dad recently asked me if I could build him a little stand to hold his iPhone up when he watches Netflix in bed. Immediately I thought of this simple design in my head. It is very simple, but it works great as well! I just cut a small angle in a piece of maple and kept testing the phone until it had a snug fit. After I had the slot cut, I cut the piece of maple to size and rounded over the top side on my router. I finished off this project with some spray lacquer and I think it came out great. This is a simple project, but it would probably sell great at craft fairs.

This week I'm kicking off 2014 with a drill press table for my brand new drill press. This drill press table is modeled after Steve Ramsey's Version. I decided to make this video to help viewers better understand how Mr. Ramsey made his drill press table. He just made a video that went over how to make it, I made this video to show each step. Make sure you check out his version by clicking his name in bold above!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 13 | How to Build a Bandsaw Cabinet

Ep. 32 | How to Make a Fancy Finger Joint Box | 1 of 2

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

SketchUp Model

​Parts List

Ep. 8 | How to Make a Rustic Bottle Opener

Ep. 11 | Can Coffee Stain Wood?

Last week a viewer asked me if I could build a bike stand. I thought that was a pretty good idea so I gathered up some 2x4 scraps and a few pieces of 2x6 as well. I measured the wheels width and length when it's on the ground. From here, I cut the wood to size to match the bike. I then cut the corners off the 2x6 on the top size to give it a nicer look. Once all the pieces were cut to size, I attached the all with wood glue and screws. The great thing about this design is it's highly customizable. By extending the length of the 2x4's, you can add more 2x6 pieces to hold up more bikes. A design like this can hold not only 1 bike, but as many bikes as you would like.

I like to play mini sticks in my free time, but often I find myself without a goalie to shoot on. I decided it would be cool if I made a wooden goalie that blocked majority of the net. I wanted it to be like a real goalie, with the corners and five hole open. I went into adobe illustrator and I made a template to cut out the shape. All I had to do from here was cut it out. If you'd like to make your own, you can download the template for this goalie or a regulation size goalie for free!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 4 | Make a Wood Mini Stick Goalie

Ep. 2 | How to Build a Sanding Organizer

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Over the next 2 weeks I'm going to be working on a fancy finger joint box. Finger joints or box joints are a joint in woodworking that I've always been interested in. There's no doubt that finger joints have a cool look to them. I've seen many different ways to make these joints, whether it's on a router or a table saw. I'm using a stacked dado set that is a 1/2" wide. The width of the blade needs to be the same as the height of the blade. Once you load it up in your table saw, you need to make the jig seen in the video (kind of hard to explain). After all the pieces are cut, you have to glue them up. I used a Q-Tip to help get the wood in all the small spaces.

This week I'm finishing up part 2 of 2 for the fancy finger joint box. I used my scroll saw to cut out the handle and edge joined two boards for the top and bottom of the box. After I cut the top and bottom pieces to size, I glue on the handle to the top piece and the bottom piece I glued onto the box. I finished the box off with a nice coat of wipe-on polyurethane it was all done. I had a hard time finishing this project with only one arm (see end of video for explanation).

This week I made these simple wood knobs using some scrap pine and 1/4" T-Nuts. I made a template to help align the holes. Once the holes on the outside are drill out, you can connect them using a scroll saw. After that, I drilled out the hole in the center for the T-Nut to go and I hammered it into place. These knobs work perfect for my drill press table I made a couple weeks ago. Don't forget to download the template below!

Ep. 38 | How to Make a Funky Wine Holder

Ep. 23 | 2014 Shop Tour

For the next 3 weeks, I will be building a wood go kart from 100% scratch. I have designed this go kart to be made from 2-2x4's and 2-2x6's. I pre-cut and clear-coated the wood to protect against water, sunlight, and temperature changes. I have put together a list of parts that you can view and purchase to make your own go kart. I have also created a 3D model of the go kart with the exact dimensions available for you to download in Sketch Up. I hope you guys enjoy this build and stay tuned for the other 2 parts!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 7 | How to Make a Simple Marking Gauge

Ep. 10 | How to Make an End Grain Cutting Board: 2 of 2

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!