Ep. 10 | How to Make a Picture Frame

Ep. 21 | How to Make a Hockey Puck Rebounder V. 2

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Make Perfect Miters with a Miter Sled!

Ep. 26 | Drill Perfect Holes | Simple Drill Guides

This week I am wood burning this pocket watch into some scrap pine. If you remember, back in December my uncle's neighbor gave me a wood burning kit. This week, he gave me a book about wood burning. To start this project out, I scanned the template out of the book onto my computer. I then mirrored the template on the computer and have it available for free in the link below. I used Steve's Ramsey's inkjet transfer process and stamped it onto a piece of pine. I traced the outline with my wood burner and burned the pocket watch clock into the wood. I outlined the clock and cut out the shape on my bandsaw. After some light sanding, I finished the project off with some wipe-on polyurethane. This project came out great and I  would definitely like to try more wood burning in the future!

My 3rd annual shop tour, not much has changed since last year!

This week I'm getting back into my weekly woodworking video and today I have a very special video, the X Carve review! A couple months ago I was contacted by Inventables and they asked me if I would review their newest machine, the X Carve. Naturally, I said yes! After a couple weeks of using this machine I can honestly say it's one of the coolest tools I've seen in my life. The X Carve is by far one of the most inexpensive CNC machines on the market, but don't underestimate it because of the price. The reason this machine can be sold for such a low price is because it comes completely unassembled. I can honestly say I would recommend this machine to anyone who has an interest in not only woodworking, but creating/making things in general. This machine can not only cut wood, but it can cut plastics, corks, MDF, aluminum, and much more! I would like to give a big THANK YOU to Inventables for giving me the opportunity to review this machine!

I was asked by a viewer if I could make a pencil holder. I made this out of some leftover 3/4" scrap wood. I ran it through the planer to mill it down to a 1/2" thick. I then ran the boards through the table saw to create 1/2" rabbets on 2 of the side pieces. I then glued up the pieces side pieces and let that dry. After all that was done, I a piece to size for the bottom of the holder. I then cut 4 rabbets in the board and glued it in the bottom of the pencil holder. Let it dry and it's all done.

Ep. 18 | Designing the Router Table

This week I'm making a simple magazine  holder for all of my woodworking magazines. I've seen a few of these on Pinterest, but instead of a wavy side piece, mine just goes straight down. It think this gives it a cleaner look and a coat of paint wouldn't hurt either! I made this out of some leftover 1/2" pine and 1/4" MDF (Medium Density Fiberboard). In order to make it fit, I measured out my magazine and built the holder around it. Simply cut the pine to size and do the same for the 1/4" MDF. I didn't have enough time to give it a paint job this week, but it would definitely spruce up the look of it. I would recommend these for anybody who has a lot of magazines. Maybe make some for you local doctor and dentist offices!

Plans or Notable Links for this weeks Project:

Router Table Model (SketchUp)

Cut List

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Steve Ramsey's Ink Jet Transfer Technique

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

This was kind of a rough week for me in and outside of the shop.

Ep. 7 | How to Make a Wood Spatula | KUBC 2015

Plans or Notable Links for this weeks Project:

Download SketchUp for Free!

Ep. 8 | How I Installed Molding

I've always been interested in canned food dispensers. I like how you pull out one and another one falls out. I designed one to fit in a slim space and it can all be done with 1-2'x4' sheet of plywood. I used a piece of 1/2" thick MDF (Medium Density Fiberboard), but I would recommend plywood instead. Almost all the pieces lock in place with rabbets and dados for an easy glue up. You can download the full scale model by clicking the link below!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

"Coping" Technique Explained

Ep. 9 | How to use SketchUp for Woodworking Projects

Ep. 14 | Failed Project | How to Make a Wood Wallet

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Christmas Scene Template

Steve Ramsey's Ink Jet Transfer Technique

I've always wanted to have a bigger router table in my shop because my bench-top table wasn't very practical anymore. I considered mounting it to the wing on my table saw, but I'm not a big fan of drilling extras holes in my expensive tools. I like this design because it gives me some storage for my router bits and it doesn't take up a whole lot of space in my shop. I made it all from 4-2x4's, 1-2x8 sheet of melamine, and 1-4x8 sheet of 3/4" thick plywood. Feel free to download all the plans for free.

Ep. 25 | How to Make a Welcome Sign

This week I gathered up some scrap 2x4's from around my shop and put together some lumber racks. Using a simple triangle design gives the rack plenty of strength to hold up the wood. After finding the studs in the walls, I attached the racks to the walls using 3" long screws. However, I would highly recommend going with some lag screws because they are much stronger and you won't have to worry about the rack ripping off the wall. I plan on painting these in the future, but for now they work great!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

I receive this steam bending kit as a Christmas gift from my Grandma & Grandpa Devine. This is the Rockler Steam Bending Kit and it costs $74.99. It comes with everything except for the wood to build it. I like kits like this because they have everything needed to build it, so you don't have to worry if you ordered all the parts. I believe I made my kit out of 1x8 pine. I used weather stripping around the door and make sure you use outdoor screws because the water will rust regular screws.

This week I'm making a floor sweep that is compatible with my shop vac. I started out by taking some scrap 1x3 pine and cutting 2 pieces to the same size for the sides. Then I cut the back piece to a size that felt right for my shop. After that, I drilled a 1 7/8" hole for the shop vac to go in the back piece. I connected the side pieces to the back and added some 1/4"MDF (Medium Density Fiberboard) for the top. I tested it out and realized that I wasn't getting the results I wanted. The dust was getting stuck in the corners. This led me to cutting 2 more equal pieces of 1x3 to angle the dust towards the hole. This help direct the dust into the hole and I was satisfied with the results. I plan on painting this project in the future, but I ran out of time to do that this week.

Ep. 27 | How to Make a $3.00 Toolbox

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Check out the Speed Out!

Ep. 30 | Make a Christmas Ornament with Fancy Inlay!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Step-by-Step Instructions and Downloads

Ep. 2 | Build a Simple 2x4 Lumber Rack

Ep. 31 | How to Make a Reindeer Christmas Decoration

Merry Christmas! This week I pulled out the old wood burner and burned a Christmas scene into a piece of 3/4" pine. If you would like to make your own, you can download the template for free. Once I had the template, I had to transfer the image onto the wood in order to trace it with the wood burner. The best method is to used Steve Ramsey's In Jet Printer Technique. Once the template was on my piece of wood, I was ready to trace it. After it was all traced up, I penciled an outline around the entire scene and took it over to the bandsaw were I cut out the outline. I sanded the sides and the back of wood burning piece and added a hanger to the back. The hanger will allow me to easily hang the picture on the wall with ease. I hope all of you have a Merry Christmas and don't forget next week is the 3rd Annual Year End Wrap Up!

Ep. 32 | Wood Burning a Christmas Scene

Many of the YouTube woodworkers got together and made some type of kitchen utensil. I made a handle for my old spatula that broke a while back. This handle is made from some scrap walnut that was laying around my shop. I cut the handle to a comfortable width and length, and then I rounded over the entire handle with my router table. I needed to make a thin slot in the end of the handle for the spatula to go and for that, I used a small drill bit. I drilled multiple holes in the bottom until it created a slot and that seemed to work great. I finished it off with some wipe-on polyurethane and epoxied the handle to the spatula. If you would like to see everyone else who participated in this challenge, click the link below!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

SketchUp Model

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Inventables Website

I thought this would be a cool project, but it didn't go the way I expected. I started out by cutting 2 pieces of 1/4" poplar to the size of a debit card. I then used Steve Ramsey's inkjet printer to wood technique. I then attempted to use velcro to hold the wallet together, but that didn't work. I struggled with it for an hour or so and it just didn't work. I thought about using a magnet, but that could deactivate credit cards or gift cards so I wouldn't want to do that. I decided it would just be best to put a rubber band around it and call it a day. This was definitely a flop, but we all have those projects that look easy, but don't work out. Right?

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Originally I wasn't going to have video this week. I've been really busy with installing laminate flooring in my room. When it came time to do the molding, I realized it would be a good opportunity to make a video! I used my miter saw to cut the wood to the correct size and angle. I made all the cuts with 45 degree angles, but I realized the boards didn't line up as tight as I wanted them. Many viewers introduced me to a technique called coping. If you read the article, it explains that you cut the board to the shape of the molding instead of an angle. This is used for the inside corners in molding and it really opened up my eyes. I've never heard of this technique, but after watching a few YouTube videos on it, I was amazed. The results are much better when you use this technique because the walls in the house are never a perfect 90 degrees (at least in my house they aren't). This week was vise-versa, the viewers taught me instead of me teaching them!

This week I'm making these simple drill bit guides. I used a leftover 2x4 that was laying around my shop for this project. Since it had paint all over it, I ran it through the planer to give it a nice smooth surface. I then cut the 2x4 into 3.5" x 3.5" sections. Once that was done, I cut out a half  moon shape on one side and drilled a hole through the top. It's very important to make the guides perfectly straight, otherwise all the holes you drill with them will be crooked too. I used a drill press, but a scrap piece of wood can give you straight holes too if you don't have one (see video for more information). I drilled out different size holes to match common bits I used around my workshop. This project is quick and easy, but it will definitely come in handy around your shop.

Ep. 20 | How to Build a Router Table | Part 2 of 2

Christmas is coming quicker each year, but this year I have an awesome reindeer project! For this reindeer, I used some walnut I had laying around the shop. First, I had to plane the walnut down to 3/4" thick. Then, I cut general sections out for each of the patterns to go. After that, I cut everything out on my bandsaw, except for the tight corners on the antlers. Once that was done, I sanded all the boards down, added some cutting board oil (I ran out of lacquer and wipe-on poly) and added the red felt collar/googly eyes. Finally, I connected the legs and antlers to the body by aligning the grooves. This project is not only great because it looks so cool with your Christmas decorations, but it folds down flat to save a lot of space for storage in the offseason. If you would like to make your own, you can download the plans for free below!

The table saw insert that came with my table saw began falling apart. The metal bracket in the back was coming off and stopping wood from running all the way through the saw. I decided it is time to make a zero clearance insert. Luckily, my table saw fits 1/4" thick plywood. I simply took a piece and traced the stock insert plate onto the wood. After cutting it out on the scroll saw, I sanded it until it fit snug in the saw. I cut a hole for my finger to pull out the insert and raised the blade to create the slot for the blade.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Steve Ramsey's Ink Jet Transfer Technique

Pocket Watch Template

Ep. 12 | Handy Woodworking Tips and Tricks

This week I'm designing the router table in SketchUp. You can download the router table for free on google SketchUp.

This week I'm making a corn toss game. My mom has been begging me to make one and I finally got around to making it this week. I used 4-2x4's and 2-2'x4' sheets of 1/2" thick plywood. I cut 4-2x4's to 48" long and another 4-2x4's to 21" long. I then connected 2-2x4's at 21" long to another 2-2x4's at 48" long to make a 2'x4' frame. From here, I screwed the 1/2" thick plywood to the top. I then measured 9" down from the top and 12" in from the side to mark the center for my hole. I then drew a 6" diameter hole and cut it out with my jigsaw. You will want to repeat the steps above to create the second board. Now I need to cut the legs to hold up the board. I cut 4-2x4's at 12" long and drilled out a 1/2" hole towards the top of each leg (refer to video). I then drilled a 1/2" hole in the side of the platform for each leg to connect. Using a 4" long 1/2" thick bolt, I thread it through the hole and used some washers and a 1/2" wing nut to hold it together.

Over the next 2 weeks, I will be building the Azusa Mini Bike Kit. I found the cheapest kit at Mini Choppers Socal. This kit was only $320, but it didn't come with an engine or clutch. I took the 212cc Predator Engine off my go kart that I made and it worked great. I used the same centrifugal clutch off my go kart as well. In part 1 of 2, I painted the bike, assembled the wheels and attached the front fork. Check back in next week for part 2 of 2.

This week I'm teaching you how to use SketchUp for woodworking projects. I love using this program because it's free and it's easy to use. The best part about this program is that it gives me an accurate visual of what a project will look like. You can test different designs and see what will and won't work without wasting money on wood. The best way to explain how to use this program, is by watching the video.

Ep. 15 | Wood Burning a Pocket Watch

Here are a few handy woodworking tips and tricks for your shop. One of the last tips in this video is actually a product that I love (I'm not getting money to promote this product, I just like it a lot) it's called the Speed Out and it works great!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Rockler Steam Bending Kit

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Router Table Model (SketchUp)

Ep. 11 | How to Make a Floor Sweep

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Guillotine Model (SketchUp File)

Parts and Cut List

Ep. 23 | How to Build the Azusa Mini Bike Kit | 1 of 2

Ep. 24 | How to Build the Azusa Mini Bike Kit | 2 of 2

A while back, I built a hockey puck rebounder and it actually got quite a few views on YouTube. This week I redesigned the rebounder to be more effective and stronger. I not only made 1 rebounder, but I made 2! The first one is based off the Extreme Passing Kit that costs $174.95 in stores. My version only costs  around $10.00. The second design cost about $10.00 as well. It it a low profile design that connects directly to a shooting mat. Speaking of which, I purchased this "shooting mat" at Home Depot for $19.99 (poly-wall material that is 4'x8')

Ep. 22 | 2015 Shop Tour

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Mini Bike Kit

212cc Predator Engine

Centrifugal Clutch

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Check Video Description for List of Participants

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 33 | 2015 Year End Wrap Up

Often times local lumber stores will mark down busted or warped boards. Every now and then, you can find pieces of wood that will allow you to build your project by simply cutting around the busted up parts. That's exactly what I did for this. I purchased 2-12"x4' long boards for only $3.00. I already had the dowel on hand, so that was free for me, but it would only be a few more dollars to pick up some dowel. My tool box is 18" long and 8" high. For the ends of the toolbox, I measure up 5" and cut off a 45 degree angle. This gave my toolbox a nice looking shape. After that, I cut 2-4.25" high and 18" long side pieces. Once that was complete, I drilled out 2-5/8" wide holes for the handle. These holes didn't go all the way through the board though, I only went down about 3/8". Once everything was cut and drilled, I sanded all of the pieces so I would have a nice, smooth box. I then cut my 5/8" piece of dowel to length and screwed the whole box together.

This week I'm making a pocket knife keyring for my keys. This is a fun project that helps store a lot of keys in a very flat area. Unlike a regular keyring, this helps keep the keys flat and tucked away until you want to pull them out. I found this project over at Instructables.com and it came with step-by-step instructions. I used 1/4" red oak for mine and a little bit of galvanized metal. I cut an oval shaped over at my scroll saw and glued the metal to the wood with some super glue. I added some wipe-on polyurethane to bring out the grain in the wood. After that, I drilled a hole in each end and threaded the keys through the bolt. To finish it off, I put lock nuts on the end of the bolt. This project was very easy to make and I had a lot of fun creating it. I encourage people with a lot of keys to make this swiss army knife key ring.

For Halloween this year, I wanted to make something that would stand out. Sure I could make a pumpkin or a tombstone decoration, but I wanted something that caught the eye of every neighbor in my subdivision. After I did some thinking, I thought it would be insane if I were to build a full size guillotine and put it out in front of the yard for Halloween. To begin the process of designing/building the guillotine, I made a 3D model of it in Google SketchUp. Once that was done, I calculated all the materials that were necessary and made a shopping/cut list. You can download that file right here. The shopping list doesn't include some misc. parts that were used in the construction of the guillotine (this includes the eye hook for the rope to connect the blade and the dowel used in the headstock). With the two 1/2" bolts around the bottom, you can easily slide them out and remove the top and bottom half with ease.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Finishing up the router table build this week. Don't forget you can download the cut list and 3D model in the description below.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 4 | Easiest way to Make Zero Clearance Inserts

How's it going guys? I hope all of you had a great Thanksgiving this year and are ready to get back in your shop! This week I'm making a Christmas ornament that features my first attempt at inlay. I grabbed some 3/4" maple that was just laying around and I ordered some 1/8" maple off of the Inventables website. With the use of Easel, I was able to design this project very easily. I simply found a picture of a reindeer on google and imported it into Easel as a vector. From here, I just selected the depth and size and I started carving away. Once I had both pieces cut out, I used some wood glue to hold the walnut in the maple and added some cutting board oil (I ran out of wipe-on polyurethane and lacquer). In order to have it hang on the tree, I added a small eye hook on the top. I really like the way this project turned out and the contrasting woods look really nice. This would be a great project to hang on your Christmas tree so everyone can see it! 

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 13 | My Lathe Snapped and Drone Rant

Ep. 1 | How to Build a Steam Box

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Original Idea from Instructables

Ep. 28 | How to Make a Creepy Guillotine for Hallowen

Ep. 19 | How to Build a Router Table | Part 1 of 2

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Router Table Model (SketchUp)

Cut List



This week I'm finishing up the Azusa Mini Bike Kit build. In part 2 of 2, I attached the 8" wheels, brakes, engine, throttle, chain, and seat. I think this came out great, but I did have a hard time getting the chain aligned. This was probably because I had to do it all by myself. This mini tops out at 28.5 mph and has a ton of torque. I will be back in the shop next week with a woodworking project.

Ep. 6 | How to Make a Simple Magazine Holder 

Ep. 5 | How to Make a $10 Canned Food Dispenser

Ep. 17 | How to Build a Corn Toss Game

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Mini Bike Kit

212cc Predator Engine

Centrifugal Clutch

Ep. 16 | Making the Pocket Knife Key Ring

Ep. 29 | Inventables X Carve | Review and First Project!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 3 | How to Make a Pencil Holder

This week I'm making a welcome sign for your house. I used 3/4" birch plywood to create the sign and the moose. The great part about this project is it can stay up all year round. You can swap out the bottom of the sign for each season or holiday. A Jack-O-Lantern would be great for Halloween and a snowman would be nice for Christmas! I used a red-tinted stain for the top and a dark brown stain for the moose. However, you could easily paint this project and it would look just as nice. I really like the way this project came out and I think the twine adds a nice touch with the moose.

Viewer Recommended Tip: Russ Veinot recommends embedding a magnet in the back to keep the sign from slamming against the door every time it's opened.Welcome Sign Template

This week I'm making a picture frame. For the longest time, I could never get perfectly tight miters. I've always had a gap on at least one side, until I used my miter sled. The miter sled helps cut miters with ease. That's truly the secret behind tight miters, a miter sled! I made this frame out of some walnut laying around in my shop. I planed it down to the correct thickness and sized up the frame to fit an 8"x10" picture. Using my miter sled, I cut the walnut to size and glued it up. After sanding, I added some wipe-on polyurethane and finished it off with a piece of leftover glass from an old picture frame. As for the picture, I printed off my favorite picture of of my cat to put in the frame (even though it doesn't match). The picture is held in by some 1/4" MDF (Medium Density Fiberboard) and brad nails. This frame came out great and if you're planning on making a picture frame, don't even bother doing so without a miter sled for your table saw!

It's been another great year for the woodworking community and I'm glad to be apart of it. Thank you all for the support throughout the 2015 woodworking season and I can't wait for next year. Have a SAFE and Happy New Years!

Subscribers at Beginning of Season: 7,220
Subscribers at End of Season: 17,200

Total Gained: 9,980


Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Reindeer Template

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!