Ep. 24 | How to Make a Longboard | The Easy Way!

Earlier in the week I saw a sports themed shelf online. This inspired me to make my own sports themed shelf for all the trophies and medals I have laying around. With some of the leftover wood from the bird feeder project, I went ahead and made this little hockey shelf. It features 7 shaker style pegs to hang your medals from and a 30" top surface where you can place a few of your trophies. The great thing about this project is how customizable it is. This shelf can easily have a hockey, football, baseball or even basketball theme to it. The key is the two side pieces. For this, I simply searched "hockey player silhouette" online and of course, I came across some great results. I found one that I liked and carved it out on my scroll saw. A little bit of glue and a few nails later, I had myself an awesome shelf. I topped it off with some black paint and this guy is ready to be hung on the wall in my room!

This week I made a few ramps for my BMX bike. I made a kicker and a landing ramp to help get me started. For this project, all you need is a jigsaw to make all the cuts. I started by cutting out the shape of my ramps on my 3/4" sheets of plywood. After I had the kicker and landing ramp sides cut out, I cut my 2'x4's for my kicker to 22.5" and 46.5" for my landing ramp. This will make my kicker exactly 2' wide when I add my plywood and it will make my landing ramp 4' wide. I then screwed the 2x4's into the side of the plywood and this created the 'skeleton' of my ramp. After I had the skeletons done, I added the plywood to the top. I would recommend using 3/4" plywood for the landing ramp and 3/8" plywood for the kicker. Countersink and screw the screws into the 2x4's of the skeleton. This will give you a kicker and a landing ramp. If you would like to paint your ramps, then now is the perfect time. Once everything is done, enjoy!

This week my friend Landon and I made a pitching mound for our backyard wiffle ball league. Why make a pitching mound you may ask? Long story short, there is a fire pit in the middle of the field so we don't want to trip over it during the game and by adding a pitchers' mound, we are able to avoid a lot of accidents. For this project I used a lot of scrap wood that has been laying around the shop for years. All of our pieces were ripped down on the table saw to 1x8's and the side lengths are 8' for the mound. The mound is roughly 8" high and 48" wide. Since the wood was very old, we painted it green to match the grass and now it looks brand new. All we had to do was pick up some plywood at our local lumber store and cut it to size. Once that was done, we added the paint and some lawnmower wheels for easy mobility and just like that, we have a brand new mound.

Ep. 18 | How to Make a Wood Mallet!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 9 | How to Make a Custom Sports Shelf

Ep. 19 | How to Make a Wood Scooter | Part 1 of 2

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Wood Mallet Template

Ep. 32 | How to Make a Pumpkin Candy Dish!

Ep. 22 | The 4th Annual Shop Tour | 2016 Shop Tour

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 2 | How to Make a Ping Pong Paddle V. 2

This week I made a fishing pole holder for a relative. It holds up to 10 fishing poles at once and casters can be added for easy mobility. For this project, I used a variety of poplar and i set me back about $55.00. The person I made it for wants to stain it himself, so there was a little work taken off my shoulders. If I did add a finish though, it'd either be a clear coat or stain. If you would like to build this, you can download the plans for free.


​Shopping List:
1x3- 10'
1x4- 6.5'
1x6- 3'
1x8- 8.5'

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:
Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Sketch Up Model

Ep. 33 | How to Make a Night Stand Charging Station!

Ep. 37 | How to Make a Vintage Christmas Sled!

Earlier in the week I saw some candle holders that were in the shape of leaves. I knew that this would be a great project to make for the fall because it is simple to make and looks great when they're all done. I started off by applying the different leaf templates to my piece of 3/4" maple (templates are available for free download). After the template was on, I went over to my scroll saw and cut out all of the pieces. After the pieces were cut to the shape of the leaves, I drilled out 1.5" wide holes that were 5/8" deep for the tea light candles to go. I gave the leaves a nice sanding and applied a few coats of danish finishing oil. The oil really makes the maple pop and these look great once the candles are set in place and lit up. I know this was a simple project, but sometimes the simplest ideas are the best. If you would like to make your own fall leaf candle holders, feel free to download the templates!

With Halloween fast approaching, I thought it'd be fun to make a pumpkin candy dish. The dish can hold well over 300+ pieces of candy in the 12"x12" pumpkin. I started out this project by cutting up a sheet of 2'x4' plywood that was 3/4" thick into 6 pieces. I cut 3 pieces at 12"x12", 2 pieces at 12"x10.5" and 1 piece at 10.5"x10.5". Once all my sheets of plywood were cut out, I went ahead and pasted my jack-o-lantern template onto one of my 12"x12" sheets of plywood and cut out the face with my jigsaw. I went ahead and assembled the box using some brad nails and wood glue for extra strength. After the box was completely assembled, I sanded and painted the entire thing orange. I went ahead and cut out a 1.5"x1.5" piece of wood that was about 3.5" long for a stem and painted that green. Once all the pieces were dry, I lined the inside of the box with black foam and hot glued it into place. From here I poured all the candy inside and it's all set for Halloween!

Ep. 19 | How to Make a Wood Scooter | Part 1 of 2

Ep. 31 | How to Make Hilarious Halloween Tombstones!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 17 | How to Make a Cruiser Board Press!

Last Christmas I received a welder from my Grandma and Grandpa Devine, but I was debating on buying a cart or making a cart for it. I decided to make a cart for it because it was not only a cheaper option, but it allows me to customize it to fit all my welding gear. For this project I used 2 sheets of 2'x4' plywood that is 3/4" thick. This will set you back about $20.00 and the wheels will set you back another $15.00. In order to make this project, you will want to download the 3D SketchUp file to see all of the measurements. Once you have the measurements, transfer them onto your two side pieces and that will allow you to cut out the side profile. After that, I cut out the back piece, the two shelves, and the front strips for the cart. I screwed everything together with 1 5/8" screws and added the casters to the bottom. This cart will allow me to roll my welder around the shop with ease and stores everything in one spot when it's not in use. 

This week I made a sign for my workshop. For this project, I used some 1/4" plywood and some 3/8" plywood (Changed to 3/4" Melamine). The first thing I needed to do was blow up my logo to the exact size I wanted the sign to be. For this, I used a program called Adobe Illustrator (Not a sponsor of my show) and it made the process really easy. I like using this program for a lot of my 2D designs. Once I had the template created, I used some spray adhesive and cut out all the parts on my bandsaw/scroll saw. After a light sanding, I spray painted my pieces to the colors that corresponded with my website. From here, I glued the piece on to a piece of 3/4" melamine that was cut to 12"x48" on my table saw. Once everything was cut and painted, I hot glued all the pieces in place. I really like the way this project came out and I would encourage anyone who wants a sign in their shop to do the same. I'm really happy with it and it makes a great addition to my shop.


This week I made a bird feeder just in time for all the birds returning home from the south. I used 1"x8" and 1"x10" pine boards for this project as well as a piece of 8"x10" polycarbonate and a set of hinges. It is extremely important to NOT use PRESSURE TREATED lumber because the chemicals can easily be transferred from the board into the bird seed. I didn't even bother applying a finish to mine because I didn't want to risk poisoning the birds and it was so simple to make so if it does rot away, I can easily make another one in the years to come. Even though this project is simple, it was a lot of fun to make because I know it will get great use from all the birds that hang around our house in the summer. 

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:
Inspiration for this Project

Ep. 23 | Make a Wood Cubby that is Great for Storage!

This week I thought it would be a fun chance to make a whirligig before the summer comes to an end. After realizing there was a lack of airplane templates online, I went ahead and made my own airplane design. I used 3/4" wood for the fuselage, 1/2" wood for the wings, tail, and part of the propeller and 1/4" wood for the propeller blades. As for the stand, I simply cut a 2x4 into a 1.5"x1.5" piece that was roughly 3' long. I used spray adhesive to apply the template to my pieces of plywood and cut out all the pieces on my bandsaw. If you don't have a bandsaw, a jigsaw or scroll saw will work great as well. After all the pieces were cut out, I sanded them to a smooth finish and applied some paint to all the pieces. I added some blue stripes to contrast the white and the propeller looked best in black. I spray painted the stand as well and attached the propeller with a nail and some washers. After setting it outside, the wind made the plane come to life!

This week I decided to update my lumber rack design from a year or two ago. For this project I used 3/4" plywood and 2x4's. The amount of wood really depends on how many racks you would like to make for your shop. I started by cutting my plywood into 13"x24" strips. From here, I drew a shape similar to a triangle on all my pieces of plywood. It was 15" in length and 13" in height. However, the ends came out 1.5" to accommodate the thickness of a 2x4. I then cut my 2x4's into 2 different lengths: 3-11.5" and 3-15" in length. Once all of my wood was cut, I drilled 5 holes in the center of my 11.5" board running up and down it. These holes are for the screws that will connect the rack into the wall. I then screwed all my pieces of wood together using a combination of 1 5/8" screws and 3" screws. Once everything was screwed together, I mounted them on the wall (you'll want to use long/heavy duty screws or lags) and added my lumber!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:
Nothing this week!

This week I was commissioned by neighbor to build six cutting boards in the shape of Michigan. I immediately thought this would be a great project for my CNC machine. This gave me the opportunity to not only talk, but demonstrate the benefits of having a CNC machine for a business. In my case, it was very handy to have a CNC machine for this scenario because it's able to carve out identical images in multiple pieces of wood. If I were to cut these pieces by hand, it would have taken a lot more time to cut out and wouldn't have been nearly as accurate. Even though it's possible to do by hand, having a CNC machine allows me to work on other stuff while the boards are being created. This allows me to be a lot more productive without having to pay other people to help me cut out the boards or take my own time to cut them out. Hopefully this helps you and if you still have some questions, you can reach me over at the contact page!

This week I set out to make some of the funny Halloween Tombstones. I always get a kick out of these when I see them so I thought it'd be fun to make some. I started out by cutting 2 sheets of 2'x4' plylwood that was 3/4" thick down to boards that measured 16"x24". After I cut those out, I went ahead and cut a 1x4 down to 2' long and ripped it to an 1.5" wide. This gave me a total of 8 pieces (3 extra) that were 1.5"x2'. Since these are the stakes for the tombstones, I cut an angle on the end so they can cut into the ground. After that, I rounded off the top of my 16"x24" pieces to a 8" radius. I took one of my 16"x24" pieces and chopped it up into 5 strips that measured 4.5"x16" (base plate of tombstone). I used pocket holes, nails and glue to assemble the tombstones and gave everything a nice sanding. I spray painted them grey and stenciled on goofy sayings in black. Once everything was dry, they're all done. (consider adding a weather resistant finish).

Earlier this week my neighbor asked me if I could build him a pedalboard for his guitar. I thought that'd be a great idea for a project because it is simple and you can save a lot of money by making your own instead of buying one online. For this project, I used solid maple. I used roughly 10' of 1x6 and 2' of 1x3. I used the 1x6 to cut 3 pieces at 22.5" and 2 pieces cut at 16.5". The 1x3 was used to cut 1 board at 22.5". I used a tapering jig to cut the angles on the 2 pieces at 16.5". For the angle, I measure 1.5" on one end and 4.5" on the other. This gave me roughly a 10 degree angle. I went ahead and cut a 10 degree angle on the front and back pieces as well. I also notched out 2- 3/4" deep areas along the 16.5" angled pieces to accommodate the 2- 22.5" 1x6 pieces that stretch across the pedalboard. If you would like to see a 3d model of this, you can download it for free! 

Ep. 34 | How to Make a Thanksgiving Table Centerpiece!

This week I'm doing my 4th annual shop tour. I do one every year during the summer for the people who enjoy these types of videos. This is just a walk around of my shop and where all my tools go when I'm not actually using them. Hopefully some people find this video beneficial. If you're not a fan of shop tour videos I completely understand and don't worry because I'll be back to regular woodworking videos next Tuesday!

This week I'm finishing up the wooden scooter build with part 2 of 2. The first thing I did was assemble the entire scooter with 5/16" dowels. I connected the 90° angle block to the base frame with wood glue and 2- 1/4" lag screws that are 2" long. After all the frame and fork pieces were done drying, I sanded the entire scooter with 150 grit sandpaper and finished the scooter with Danish Oil. I rubbed this into the wood and gave it a few coats. After the finish had fully cured, I connected the forks to the frame via a 1/2" bolt that was 5" long. I used a total of 4 washers and a lock nut to hold everything together. The key is to use a washer between the wood so it doesn't touch. Then put the lock nut on so it's not tight to the wood, but the lock nut is able to stay in place without having to worry about it moving. I used a similar process for the wheels, added grip tape and it was all done! If you want to make one, check out the links for all the parts!

Thanksgiving is right around the corner, so I decided it would be a good time to make a nice center piece for the dinner table. In order to make this project, you'll only need 1- 1x4 that is 8' long and spray paint or stain (handles for the ends of the box are optional). I started by cutting my board into 4 pieces: 2 at 34" long and 2 at 5" long. I drilled holes in both of my 5" pieces to accept the handles and the thoroughly sanded all of the pieces. After that, I assembled the box with some brad nails and wood glue. After the glue was dried, I re-sanded the entire box and painted it with some brown spray paint. From here, I installed the handles and it was all done! This project is very simple to make, but really looks great once all the decorations are added to the inside. This would be a great project for a beginner because of the simplicity of it and the final project has an awesome look to it once it's all decked out with candles, leaves, acorns, and more!

This weeks project used 3/4" thick maple. To start, I took one of the boards and ripped it over at my table saw down to 2 1/2" wide. I cut a 1/2" wide, 1/4" deep rabbet on the 2 1/2" board and used a forstner bit to drill down an 1/8" and that left me with three holes that were 3/4" of an inch in diameter on my other board. After sanding, I glued the boards together and finished it with spray-on polyurethane. Once the finish has dried, I used epoxy to glue the magnets to the wood and it was complete!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

My CNC Machine (THIS IS NOT A SPONSORED VIDEO)

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

After multiple requests to make a homemade version of 'The Original Sauce Kit', I was able to come up with a homemade version. For the frame of the net, I used 3/4" thick PVC pipe and made my nets 10"x10" wide. I wasn't able to figure out how big the factory version of this product was so I just had to guess, but I think the size is perfect. After I cut and assembled the PVC pipe, I painted it red so it would resemble a hockey net. While that was drying, I cut my sheets of plywood to the correct size (A materials/cut list is available in the description of the video), screwed the 2x4 material to the base plate and painted all my wooden pieces black. Once it was all dry, I added the hinges to the 2x4 on the front. From there, I added the net with zip ties, drilled holes for the bolts to go and connected the PVC pipe to the wooden base plate. Add some Velcro to keep it closed and you're all done!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Longboard Templates

This week I'm updating my longboard video from a few years back (2013). In order to make this longboard, you will need 1 sheet of 1/4" thick plywood that measures 2'x4'. I went ahead and cut the sheet of plywood up into 3 strips that were 8" wide and 48" long. From here, I glued up all 3 pieces to make one solid board that had an arch in the middle. I achieved this by placing a 2x4 on each end and a heavy object in the middle. Once the board was dry, I added my template to the board with some spray adhesive and cut it out with a jigsaw. I gave the board a nice sanding and then sealed the entire board with some clear coat. This will help keep the board from rotting away after a long period of time. I then added stickers to cover the entire bottom (instead of painting the board). After that I added grip tape as well as the trucks and I was off riding. If you would like to make your own, I've included a website that has great templates for longboards.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

With 2016 coming to an end in the next couple of days, it is time for the annual Year End Wrap Up video. In this video, I go over what happened throughout the year of 2016 and a few goals that I have for next year as well. I have a few big changes that I'm making next year so make sure you watch. Finally, I'd like to thank everyone who has supported me this year and I look forward to making more great content for you guys next year!


​Subscribers at Beginning of Season: 17,200
Subscribers at End of Season: 34,762

Total Gained: 17,562


Congratulations to the Detroit Red Wings on their 25th consecutive playoff appearances! As a celebration, I wanted to make something special this week. That's why I created this Picture frame that says it all. I used some 3/4" pine and milled out majority of the frame on my CNC machine. After that was all done, I milled out the number 25 on some 1/4" pine and painted everything. The 25 was painted red, the frame black, and the lettering on the inside is white. I used nails to give the miters a little extra support and added the picture with the glass to top it off. I really like the way it came out and if you're a red wing fan, you can use the links to Easel which will allow you to carve out your own frame. Thanks for watching and if you're new to my channel, I try and post new woodworking videos almost every Tuesday! Please give the video a thumbs up and don't share it so all of your friends can see it!

Ep. 11 | How to Make a Pitching Mound

Ep. 10 | Celebrate 25 Red Wing Playoff Appearances!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

A while back I had a viewer by the name of William Wilson offer me the plans to make this clamp rack and I couldn't turn it down. This rack can hold 38 clamps and if you add dowels to the sides, you can store your spring clamps. This only uses one sheet of 2'x4' plywood that is 3/4" thick, which will only set you back $10.00  I used a series of dados, rabbets, and grooves to join everything together for a solid finished product.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3/4" Frame Pieces (Easel)

1/4" Numbers (Easel)

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Sketch Up Model

Shopping/Cut List

First off, you will want to download the templates in the description of this video.  After that, place the blade template on a piece of 1/8" thick birch plywood and the handles go on a 1/4" thick piece of hardwood. I added a round-over to the handles and glued everything together. Then, you will have to pick between rubber or sandpaper for your paddle. I chose to go with 150 grit sandpaper and I attached it to my paddle with spray adhesive. You can use a razor to trim off the extra material and then your done!

Ep. 30 | How to Make Fall Leaf Candle Holders!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Sketch Up Model

This week my neighbor asked me if I could make her a cubby. My design called for 2- 2'x4' sheets of 3/4" thick plywood. Then I cut all my pieces to their correct size base off my cut list. After I had all my pieces cut, I used a series of rabbets and dados to connect all the pieces. I used wood glue and nails to assemble the entire project and once it was all dry, I sanded everything to a very smooth finish. If this project is going in your house, then I would highly recommend painting it. However, if it's for your shop, then the wooden look will be fine!


Cut List:
2- 11"x21.5" (Top and Bottom)
2- 11"x15.75" (Sides)
2- 10.25"x10.25" (Shelves)
1-10.25"x15.75" (Divider)
1-15.75"x20" (Back)

Ep. 5 | How to Make a Table Saw Sled

After searching online for fun Christmas projects to make, I came across a website that published this idea. I thought this would be a great project to share with everyone who enjoys my videos. This project ran me about $15.00 in wood/paint and the glue/nails I already had in my shop. If you would like to make your own shelf, here is the cutting/shopping list to do so:


Shopping List
3- 1x4's minimum

Cut List
1- 35" Long (Center)
4- 17" Long (30 Degree Bevel on one End)
12- 6" (30 Degree Bevel Parallel to each other)
12- 3.5" (30 Degree Bevel on one end) 

Ep. 16 | How to Make a Pedalboard | Guitar Project!

This week I'm making a vintage Christmas sled. I started off by making a set of templates for all of the pieces that you'll need (PDF Download Available). I then started out by cutting a 6' long 1x10 down to 43" in length. This board will be for the sled runner templates to go. However, there is plenty of extra space and that's were I put majority of the other templates. From here, I grabbed some scrap 1x4 and cut 2 boards at 25.5" long and 1 board at 32" long. I pasted the seat templates onto those three boards and cut everything else out as well. After a good sanding, I painted my pieces red and white and waited for them to dry. I assembled everything with a brad nailer. Now you can either take it inside/outside and use it as a neat decoration for your house this Christmas season! I hope you guys enjoyed this project and if you did, remember there is a free set of templates that are available for download. I hope everyone has a Merry Christmas!


Ep. 4 | How to Make the Ultimate Clamp Rack | $10

This week I made a shelf to hold all of my finishing supplies. A lot of my finishing supply was originally held underneath my 10' long workbench, but I need that space to store other tools now. This led me to design this 2'x4' shelf that uses 2 sheets of 3/4" plywood and 1 sheet of 1/4" plywood. I started out by cutting my 3/4" plywood into 5" wide strips that were 48" long. After I cut those, I went ahead and cut the strips into their final dimensions. I needed 2 strips to be 46 1/2" long, 2 more to be 24" long and 6 more to be 22 1/2" inches.  I used pocket holes and glue to hold everything together and added a french cleat on the back to easily hang it up on the wall. If you're interested in making this project, you can download the 3D model of it for free!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Sketch Up Model

Shopping/Cut List

This week Rockler Woodworking and Hardware went out of there way to help out a YouTube woodworker. A few weeks ago I made a clamp rack that was inspired by William Wilson's version that he asked me to make. However, once I made the video, William Wilson went out of his way to help me out. He asked Rockler if they could send me some clamps for my clamp rack and they delivered. Rockler sent more than just clamps, they sent me boxes of awesome woodworking gear. Thank you so much to both Rockler and William Wilson for making this possible! 

In the next month or so I'm going to be building a cruiser board video. I want to use a press for that video so I made one ahead of time this week. For this project, I used 2 sheets of 3/4" plywood that was 2'x4' and about 12- 1/2" bolts that are 3 1/2" long. I also used about 24 washers and 12 nuts as well as some packaging tape to keep the press from being glued shut. I started by ripping my plywood into 2- 11" strips and cut one of them down to 35" long. I used the other 11" strip and cut a 25° bevel on one end. I cut the other end to size later in the video. From here, I took my last sheet of 2'x4' plywood and cut a 9" strip. I rough cut 2 pieces to 7" and and 4 more pieces to 5". I added 25° bevels to one side of those pieces and cut them to size after I stacked them all in place. From there, I drilled 12 1/2" holes in the press and taped the inside of the press with packaging tape to prevent any glue squeeze out.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Ping Pong Template

CNC Cutting Template and Instructions

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Airplane Whirligig Template

Ep. 36 | How to Make a Snowflake Shelf!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

This week I updated my cruiser board video from 2013. It's the most popular video on my channel to date and it's standard definition. I thought this would be a good opportunity to make a better version of both the board and video. This time around I used a 7 ply construction that consist of 3 different types of Hard Rock Canadian Maple (2 Face Plys, 2 Cross Plys, and 3 Core Plys). I used my Cruiser Board Press and some Titebond II (not a sponsor) to glue and sandwich all 7 plys together. Using a variety of plys adds a remarkable amount of strength to the overall board and will give it a longer life span in return. Once the board was all pressed and dried, I added my 27" version of the template and cut it out with a jigsaw. From here, I drilled holes for the trucks, sanded it and finished it with a water resistant clear coat. I added some grip tape to the board and secured the trucks and took it for a quick test ride. The board not only rides great, but looks great!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Fall Leaf Tea Candle Holder Templates

Ep. 38 | 2016 Year End Wrap Up!

Ep. 13 | How to Make a Fishing Pole Holder!

Ep. 1 | How to Make a Modern Key Rack

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Jack-O-Lantern Face Template

Ep. 3 | How to Make a Retro TV Phone Stand

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

This week I'm making a night stand charging station that can hold my phone, a couple of watches and a pair of sunglasses. For this project, I used 1x6 maple (about 3') to build the entire station. I started out by glueing two of my 1x6's boards together to get a much wider board. This board will be the main piece of the charging station. From here, I went ahead and carved out the design (available for free downloads) on my CNC machine. If you don't have a CNC machine, I went ahead and made plans that can be cut out by hand as well. Once my main board was carved out, I went ahead and cut the bottom piece that would act as a kick-stand. After a thorough sanding of all the pieces, I went ahead and finished the entire project with danish oil. After the oil was all dried, I loaded up the station with all of my devices and it was complete. I'm really happy with how this project came out, despite it being a fairly easy build. 

Ep. 15 | How to Make a Finishing Supply Shelf!

Ep. 27 | How to Make a Cruiser Board | Free Templates!

Ep. 7 | How to Make a Welding Cart

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

This week I came up with a crazy idea: I want to make a wooden scooter! I initially thought this was going to be a lot harder than it actually was, but it actually turned out to be fairly easy. I used 3/4" maple for the frame and purchased some cheap 10" wheels from harbor freight and they were exactly what I was looking for. In part 1 of 2, I cut majority of my pieces to their final size with the help of the cut list that you can download for free. I cut 2-35" pieces for the handlebars as well as 2-32.5" pieces for the bottom platform. On the 32.5" pieces, I cut a 45° angle to make the scooter look a little bit less 'bulky' per say. I then drilled a 5/8" hole in each of my 35" and 32.5" pieces to account for the axle. Once I was done with that, I went ahead and glued together the 3-10" pieces and 3- 9.25" pieces to make a very strong 90° angle. That's about all I got done this week and I'll have the rest of the scooter finished next week so make sure you stay tuned for that!

This week I'm making a wood mallet with some of the leftover wood from the pedalboard project I made a few weeks back. I used 3/4" maple scraps and I had just enough to create the mallet. I used the template I created to cut out the handle and cut out 2-6.25"x3.5" pieces and 2 more 2.5"x3.5" pieces on my table saw. Once I had everything cut out, I thoroughly sanded the mallet until it was very smooth to the touch. I took the handle of the mallet and ran a 1/4" round-over on both sides. I didn't round-over the portion of the handle that will be glued into the mallet though. After I had everything ready, I went ahead and glued all of the pieces together. Once the glue was dried, I re-sanded everything and finished the entire project with some danish oil. I really like how this project came out and it was a lot easier than I thought it would be. If you would like to make your own, I have a free template that you can download in order to do so!

Ep. 26 | How to Make Foul Poles | Baseball Project!

Ep. 6 | Look What Rockler Sent Me!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D SketchUp Model

This week I built a table saw sled for my table saw. Table saw sleds are great for making large crosscuts that a normal miter gauge couldn't hanlde. I made mine out of this 3/4" plywood and I used some 1/2" plywood for the runners. However, I would recommend using hardwood for the runners because they'll be stronger in the long haul. I used pocket hole screws to attach the front and back fence to the sled and they worked out really well. If you don't have pocket hole screws, you can always place your screws on the bottom of the sled and drill them up into the fence. If your sled isn't sliding across the table top like you would like it to, trying adding paste wax to the bottom of the sled. This should make the sled slide over the top of the saw with ease. If that still doesn't help, then try sanding the runners and reapply the paste wax. That should give you the results you're looking for.

Ep. 8 | How to Make a Bird Feeder

Ep. 12 | How to Make a Trophy!

Ep. 20 | How to Make a Wood Scooter | Part 2 of 2

Ep. 35 | How to Make a Lumber Rack (New Version)

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:
Vintage Sled Templates

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

​3D Sketch Up Model

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Cutting Diagram

William Wilson

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Sketch Up Model

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:
Nothing this week!

Ep. 25 | How to Build BMX Ramps!

Ep. 15 | How to Make a Finish Supply Shelf!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Sketch Up Model

This week I thought it would be fun to change it up a bit and work with some PVC pipe. I thought it would be a cool addition if I added foul poles to my baseball field. I purchased 4 pieces of 1 1/4" PVC pipe at 10' long, 2- 1 1/4" 'T' pieces,  6- 1 1/4" Elbows, 1- 2' piece of 2" PVC pipe, and 2- 1 1/4" couplers (these are optional if you had to get your 10' pieces of pipe cut down to 5' in order to fit them in your car). Once I had all these pieces, I cut the 1 1/4" pipes down to 4 pieces at 12" long and 4 at 35" long. This gave me the box portion at the top of the poles. Then I added 2- 5' pieces of 1 1/4" pipe onto the end of the top and used a coupler to join the 2- 5' pieces together. I painted them yellow and zip tied some net to the top to give it a more realistic look and then placed 1' of my 2" wide pipe into the ground on each side of the field. This allows me to put the poles up and down instantly. BONUS: The same idea can be used for a volleyball net!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Retro TV Phone Stand Template

CNC Cutting Template and Instructions

This week I made a trophy for the backyard wiffle ball league I play in on the weekends. For this project, I used some walnut I had laying around the shop and planed it down to 3/4" thick. After that, I cut 4 pieces of 1 1/4" conduit down to 20" lengths. I painted them a silver metallic color to match the top piece on the trophy. As for the walnut, I used my CNC machine to carve out a bunch of circles (1-4.5", 1-6.5", 3-8.8", 2-10.5"). On two of the 8.5" circles, I had the machine drill out 4 holes that are 1.5" in diameter. Once I had everything carved up, I sanded it all and assembled it will some brad nails and glue. I finished it off with some danish finishing oil and glued the conduit pipes into the wooden portions of the trophy. You'll need to drill a 1/4" hole in the top for your trophy piece (you can order these online, I got a bunch on ebay for a really low price). Glue the top piece in place and you're all done!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

A materials/cut list is available in the description of the video!

Ep. 28 | How to Make 'The Original Sauce Kit'

Ep. 14 | How to Make a Sign | Great for Workshops!

Ep. 21 | Is a CNC Machine Beneficial for a Business?

Ep. 29 | How to Make an Airplane Whirligig

This week I'm making a phone stand that converts your everyday cell phone into a retro tv. For this project, I used 1/4" and 3/4" birch plywood. I used my CNC machine to carve out the pieces, but if you don't have a CNC machine, I have created a set of plans that gives you everything you need to make your own (templates are in the description of the video). Not only does this project look cool, but it works great as a highly functional stand for your cell phone.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!