Ep. 16 | How to Make a Pair of Nightstands

After converting my dust collection system into a 2 stage dust collector, I decided it would be a good idea to build something that could accommodate that in my shop. This led to me create a miter saw station that could not only have a ton of storage, but could allow me to run PVC pipe on the ground behind the cabinets. This workbench will allow me to setup a dust collection system that can run 4" PVC pipe to each and every tool in my shop, without having to weave my way around all of the other workbenches in my shop. If you're interested in building this miter station, you can download the free set of plans to create your very own!

This week I'm officially kicking off the Halloween builds with this electric chair lawn decoration. I started out by cutting all of my lumber to size over on my table saw. For the frame, I used pocket hole screws to assemble all of the 2x3's. The seat slats were simply glued into place and the chair was ready for paint.  After a few coats of brown spray paint, the wood portion of the chair was complete. From here, I disassembled a work light and some flexible electrical hose (3/4" hose). Using epoxy, I glued one of the adapters that came with the flex hose into the top of the work light. This allowed me to stick the hose in there. For the arm/leg braces straps, I used hole straps and gave everything a few coats of silver spray paint. Once it was all dry, I epoxied the two ends of the hose to the work light and glued magnets onto the chair (to allow the hole straps to be taken on/off with ease). If you'd like to build this project, I have a free set of plans available for download!

This week I'm making a sword holder for an Army Veteran that goes to the same college as me. For this project, I used solid oak 1x4's to construct the holder. I edge joined 4 of them at 4' long each using dowel joinery to ensure there's no shifting of the wood in the future. For the design on the board, I used my X-Carve to carve out everything. When the carving was done, I glued on a 2 blocks of 1x2 oak at 3" long with a 45 degree bevel on the front (to give it a smoother look) and a slot on the tops for the sword to drop into place. After giving everything a good sanding,  I applied black paint to the inside of the letters/helicopters. Once the paint dried, I resanded the excess paint off of the top to give the lettering/helicopter a nice sharp edge. For the finish, I applied a few coats of wipe on polyurethane to really pull out the grain in the wood. I have to say that I'm very happy with how this came out and I'm confident that he'll like it as much as I do.

Shopping List
2x4's:
23- At 8' Long
3/4" Plywood:
3- 4'x8' Sheets
Extras:
1- Box of 1 5/8" screws
2- Box of 3" screws
1- Box of 3.5" Wall Anchoring Screws
Cut List
2x4's:
10- 8' Long (Main Shelves and Ceiling Mounted Braces)
26- 21" Long (Shelf Supports)
5- 45.5" (End Shelves and Ceiling Mounted Braces)
6- 48" (Drop Down Ceiling Braces)
3/4" Plywood:
3- 4'x8' (Lumber store can rip it down to 2'x4' pieces)

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Cutting Template

Ep. 8 | Make the Ultimate Gaming/Video Editing Desk 

Summer is sneaking up on us soon, so this week I decided to build a game that could be played during family barbecues, graduation parties or even hanging out with friends on the weekend. For this project I used:

2- 1x4's at 8' Long

1- 2'x4' 1/2" Sheet of Plywood

​2- 3" PVC Couplers

8- 5/8" Washers

1- Bag of Sand

1- Box of 1 5/8" Wood Screws

-20' Length of Chain

-Epoxy

-Water Resistant Clear Coat

-Spray Paint (2 Colors of your choice)

The boxes measure 16"x16" and the 3" PVC coupler is centered in the middle of the box. In order to differentiate teams, paint 4 washers one color and 4 more another color.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this Week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Model and Shopping/Cut List

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 23 | How to Make a Christmas Tree Sign

Ep. 7 | How to Make a Hat Rack | Holds 20 Hats!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this Week!

Ep. 13 | How to Build Garage Shelves (The Best Way)

With another cold winter coming this year, I decided it's time to insulate my garage door before it's too late. Fortunately, they make a kit that's very affordable and super easy to install by yourself. Each kit costs $90.00 and it will cover a single car garage door. Since my garage is a 3 car garage, I needed 3 of these kits which ran me about $270.00. To get stated, you'll begin by attaching 2 clips to each section of the door. Once your clips are attached, you'll need to measure each section of your garage and cut the pieces of insulation to size. After they've been cut, you simply push the insulation into place, cut a slit to allow the back clip to stick through and pop another clip onto the front. Now originally I wasn't going to make a video on this, but the more I thought about it, I figured a lot of people might be interested in how to go about doing it. Let me know if you think I should do more videos like this in the future!

This week I did my fifth annual shop tour. Every year I like to do a quick tour of my workshop to show everyone how I like to keep my tools laid out. Some major additions to my shop this year include a miter saw station and a dust collection system. If you're not a fan of these types of videos, don't worry because I'll have normal projects picking back up next Tuesday!

Shopping List:
2- 4'x8' Sheets of 3/4" Oak Plywood
1- Box of 5/16" Dowels (Dowel joinery tools required)
16- Shelf Pins
2- 25' Rolls of Edge Banding
2- Quarts of Stain (I used Ebony)
4- Cans of Lacquer
Cut List:
2- 12"x78" (Sides)
5- 34.5"X11.25" (Shelves)
1- 34.5"x12" (Top Shelf)
2- 34.5"x3" (Top and Bottom fronts)
1- 35.25"x77 5/8" (Back)
Dado Pieces:
-Top shelf (Back Edge) 3/4" wide and 3/8" deep
-Sides (Back Edge) 3/4" wide and 3/8" deep (The top of the dado can't go through on one side or else it will show)

This week I'm making one last decoration for Halloween. I saw the idea for these window silhouettes on Pinterest and thought many of you guys would like this as well. All you need to make this is a sheet of 2'x4' plywood that is 1/4" thick, black spray paint and a little bit of rope. I started out by applying the templates to the plywood with the help of some spray adhesive. From here, I cutout all of the shapes with my jigsaw (the 1/4" plywood cuts like butter since it's so thin). You'll need to drill a small hole in the top of the handles to hang your silhouettes and then you can give everything a light sanding. After that, I went ahead and spray painted all of my pieces black. All there's left to do is add the rope and hang them up on the window (I used adhesive clips to hang them). If you would like to make this project yourself, I have a free set of plans that you can download and print out for your own use. Regular projects will resume next week!

Ep. 11 | How to Make a Saw Blade Shop Clock

After being asked by a good friend of mine, I gave my best shot at making a pair of wooden sunglasses this week. For this project, I used a small chunk of hardwood (maple in my case) to construct the frame. Keep in mind that this project doesn't require a lot of wood, so if you'd like to use an exotic wood it wouldn't break your bank. For the lenses, I used an old pair of sunglasses, but you can also buy lenses on amazon or ebay if you need multiple identical pairs. As for the hinges, I cut them off an old pair of reading glasses and epoxied them onto my wooden frame and side pieces. This seemed to work out pretty well (I tried finding hinges online, but I couldn't find anybody that sold hinges). I used a scroll saw to cut out the frame and a Dremel to cut the grooves for the lenses to go. After a lot of sanding, you'll want to finish your sunglasses with a clear coat (wipe-on poly) and install the lenses. If you'd like to make your own pair, you can download the free template!

Ep. 12 | How to Build Garage Shelves (The Best Way)

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Clock Mechanism (Amazon)

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Hat Rack Template

Ep. 15 | How to Make a Modern Looking Bookshelf

Ep. 22 | How to Make an American Flag Case

Ep. 13 | Shop Tour 2017: My Garage Woodshop 

Ep. 26 | 2017 Year End Wrap Up

I've always wanted one of the saw blade shop clocks in my workshop, but I didn't want to simply go out and buy one of the cheap ones. I wanted one that was authentic and made from a real saw blade. For this project, I started out by removing the branding/labels on the front side of the saw blade with my angle grinder and a wire brush attachment. This did a great job of cleaning it as well. From here, I lined up my templates and masked off the rest of the saw blade with masking tape. A few coats of black spray paint was good enough and once it dried, I peeled the masking tape/number templates off of the saw blade. All there was left to do now was add the clock mechanism and set the time. I had to use some drywall safe adhesive strips to hold the clock on the wall since the kit didn't include any good way of hanging the clock. I was very happy with the final product and it ended up being cheaper to make compared to buying the store-made versions!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Stencil Template

Frisket Film (Stencil Material)

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Templates

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Wood Sunglasses Template

Ep. 14 | How to Make Solid Wood Sunglasses

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Insulation Kit (No Affiliation/Sponsorship)

This week I wanted to take a whack at making an LED sign using wood and a piece of acrylic. I started off by finding a design for my sign. The best thing you can use for this is a combination of google images and Adobe Illustrator (Not a sponsor). Once I had my design, I sent it out to be carved on my X-Carve CNC machine. While it was carving, I got to work on the actual box. For this I used pine 1x2's and a little bit of 1/4" plywood. I constructed the box to fit the piece of of acrylic I was carving out and used miters on the corners to give it a bit of a nicer look. Once I had the frame built, I built the back portion of the box. This was also made out of pine 1x2's and was about a 1/2" smaller than the wood frame. With the help of a rabbeting bit, I made a channel in the back side of the box that allowed me to drop the 1/4" plywood into. From here, I glued the box to the mitered frame, painted it black, glued in the acrylic and added the LED's to finish it off.

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing This Week!

This week I'm kicking off the Christmas season with this Christmas Tree Sign. All you'll need for this project is a piece of 1/4" thick plywood, scrap wood for the frame (I used some walnut scraps), frisket film (to make the stencil) and spray paint (white, black, green and red). You'll also need the template to make the stencil (Template can be found Here). I started off by cutting my plywood to 16"x16" and then I ripped 4 pieces of walnut to 3x4"x1" wide strips. On the 1" face of the walnut, I cut a 1/4" groove in all four pieces which allows the plywood to slide into place. From here, I cut the walnut strips to fit around the sheet of 16"x16" plywood. Using white spray paint, I painted a base coat onto the plywood. Once that was dry, I took my template and painted all of the colors on. After the paint dried, I removed the template and assembled the walnut frame around the outside. I finished the walnut with a few coats of danish oil and then I was all done!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Model

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Shopping/Cut List

3D Sketch Up Model

This week I'm building a wall hanging organizer that is perfect for college students trying to stay organized. For this project I started by cutting my plywood down to its final dimensions (refer to cut list). From there I started cutting the dados into the pieces that required them. Once all the work at the table saw was done I started the assembly. I used dowel joinery to join the main frame together and for the shelf/magazine rack portion I used brad nails and wood glue. Once both of those pieces fully cured I went ahead and connected them together. At this point I sanded everything nice and smooth and gave it a few coats of spray paint. With the paint dry, you can go ahead and add the dry-erase board, cork board, coat rack hooks and a few wall hanging hooks to the backside. Now the board is ready to be mounted onto the wall! If you'd like to make your own, you can download the free 3D Model and the Shopping/Cut List!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

Ep. 3 | How to Setup a Dust Collection System

Ep. 21 | How to a LED Sign | Detroit Lions Edition

Ever since my friend and I built a computer last summer, my desk no longer was able to fit my dual monitors. I needed something larger to be able to hold my monitors with ease and I wanted an easy way to manage all of the cables that go along with having a computer. I came up with this modern design that only uses 2 sheets of 3/4" oak plywood and 2- 1 1/4" oak dowels. I finished the desk with 2 coats of classic black polyshades (stain and polyurethane combined).  It costed roughly around $175.00 to construct and I think it was well worth the money compared to similar ones I've seen online for hundreds more. This desk can be used as either a gaming or video editing desk. There is plenty of room to store both your computer and gaming console on the side shelves. If you would like to build this desk yourself, I have a free set of plans that you can download for free!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this week!

With the fall season here, I decided it would be a good time to work on some fall themed projects. This week I built slatted wood pumpkins out of 6- 1x4's that were 6' long and 2 cans of orange spray paint as well as 1 can of green spray paint. I started by cutting the pieces for each pumpkin. The biggest pumpkin is 36" high, the medium pumpkin is 24" high and the smallest is 16" high. Looking back on this project after I built it, I would've made the largest pumpkin around 30" tall. After cutting all the boards to size, I cut off the corners of each pumpkin to give them a more rounded look. I used a hammer and nails to connect everything together, but kept the pumpkins separate from the stems and base prior to painting. Once everything was painted, I finished the assembly by nailing on the stems and using pocket hole screws to attach the base to the pumpkins. If you liked this project, please show your support by liking and subscribing!

Ep. 17 | How to Make a Wall Hanging Organizer

Ep. 10 | Making a Sword Holder for an Army Veteran

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Model, Materials List and Cut List

Ep. 1 | How to Convert a Dust Collector

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Shopping and Cutting List

3D Sketch Up Model

After getting a recommendation to make a furniture project on last weeks video, I decided this week would be a great opportunity to do so. I ended up designing and building this entrance table to sit by the front door in our house. I constructed this table out of solid oak that I picked up at my local big box store. Once I purchased all of my materials, I followed my cut list and made all of the cuts at my table saw. I used dowel joinery to join everything together and I have really became a huge fan of this technique because of it's strength and the ability for the dowels to go unseen when it's all glued up. After I had my base and my top done, I sanded them as individual pieces and used metal brackets to connect the top of the table and the base of the table. After assembling everything, I applied a few coats of wipe-on polyurethane and waited for everything to dry. This project will now sit in my house for years and years to come!

If you're anything like me, my workbenches are constantly getting covered in paint, stain and dried up wood glue. I knew there had to be some sort of way to prevent this from happening though. After doing a little bit of research, I came across a rosin paper workbench cover dispenser. All I had to do was purchase a roll of rosin paper and figure out some way to mount it to my workbench. I used a 2'x4' sheet of scrap 3/4" thick plywood to build 2 dispenser (One for each end of my miter saw station). The rosin paper I purchased is about 167' long and about 3' wide, but I had to cut a little over a foot off so it would fit my workbench nicely.  I used a 5/8" threaded rod to hold the roll onto the wooden portion of the dispenser and a nut/washer on each end to keep it from sliding out the sides. The paper rolls out of the dispenser smoothly and will do a great job of keeping my workbenches looking brand new. 

Ep. 5 | How to Make a Rosin Paper Workbench Cover

Ep. 20 | How to Make Halloween Window Silhouettes

Ep. 23 | How to Make a Christmas Tree Sign

Ep. 4 | How to Build an Entrance Table

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this Week!

Ep. 6 | How to Make Washers the Game

Ep. 2 | How to Make a Miter Saw Station

This week I'm installing a complete dust collection system in my workshop. I started off by going out to my workshop and measuring how much 4" PVC pipe I would need in order to run dust collection to all of my tools. Once I had those measurements, I planned out where each blast gate, splice, and hose clamp would go, as well as all of the adapters and flex hose. After I had a general idea of all the materials/accessories that I would need, I went out and purchased all of the stuff require (online and in-stores). Once I had all of the materials, I started the installation. Simply cut your pipe to size and fit everything together. After everything was all setup, I added a wireless power switch so the dust collector could be turned on from any location in the shop by the click of a remote. After making a few test cuts on my table saw, I'm extremely pleased with the results so far!

Ep. 25 | I am the Woodworking Nut | Trailer Video

With 2017 coming to a close, it's time for another year end wrap up video. This gives me an opportunity to talk about everything that was accomplished in 2017 and allows me to set new goals for the 2018 woodworking season. Thank you to everyone who gave me their support this year!!


Subscribers at Beginning of Season: 34,762
Subscribers at End of Season: 50,421

Total Gained: 15,659

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Model and Shopping/Cut List

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Game Rules

Ep. 24 | How to Insulate your Garage/Shop Door

This week I was asked by one of my friends at school who wanted me to build him a case for one of his flags that he received while he was in the army. I thought this was a great idea and it was perfect timing since Veterans Day was last Saturday. For this project, I used some scrap oak 3/4" thick plywood, I began constructing the frame for the case. I cut the plywood to get a few 1x2's for the front and back triangles and added 45 degree miters on the ends of each of them. This allowed me to get the 45,45,90 triangle that I was going for. Using a rabbetting bit in my router, I cut out slots in the back of each triangle (one for the glass and one for the plywood). From here, I cut a few more strips of plywood to 3" wide and mitered the ends of those as well to form the middle triangle. After that, I glued the back frame to the middle triangle, cut out the plywood and glass, painted all of the wood, added the glass to the front triangle and glued the front onto the case to finish it off.

Ep. 19 | How to Build an Electric Chair Lawn Decoration

Ep. 18 | How to Build Slatted Wood Pumpkins

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

3D Model and Shopping/Cut List

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Recommended Materials and Accessories List

To kick off the new season on my channel, I'm converting my 2HP Harbor Freight dust collector that I received from my grandparents (Thank you Grandma and Grandpa Devine!). I started out by drilling 2 holes in the top of a 32 gallon trash can lid that fit a piece of 4" PVC pipe snug. From there I used sealant to glue on my 2 couplers on the top side of the lid and my 2 elbows on the bottom side of the lid with a piece of 4" wide, 3" long PVC pipe to hold the coupler and elbow together. On the inside of the lid, I also added weather stripping to create the most airtight seal possible. I then slid in 2- 4" splice connectors into the 3" piece of PVC pipe and that stuck out of the couplers on top, which allowed me to add dust collection hose from my trash can to my impeller. I then ran PVC pipe outside and hooked up the other end of my impeller to that (this allows the low micron dust to blow outside). After a quick test, the 2 stage dust collector was working flawlessly!

With last weeks project cutting so much into this week, I only had a couple of days to build a project/make a video. For this project, I started by creating a template for the cup in Adobe Illustrator. This program is great for anyone who needs to make a lot of 2D templates. Once I had my template created, it was a matter of printing it out and pasting it onto my wood. I used 1/2" plywood for the coffee mug shape and 3/4" plywood for the base. I used a bandsaw/jigsaw to cut out the template and drilled out the holes with a 1 5/8" forstner bit. Then I cut the base to 5.25"x3.5" and beveled one of the 5.25" ends to 80°. Then I gave all of my pieces a quick sanding and glued them together with wood glue. Once it was dry, a few coats of black spray paint and it was all done. It's nice to do a simple project every now and then, especially after making a huge one (like last week). As always, if you'd like to make this project yourself, there is a free template available!

Every now and then I like to update my channel trailer to hopefully bring in more subscribers. Hope you enjoy!

Plans or Notable Links for this week's Project:

Nothing this Week!

This week my friend Andrew (from college) and I set out to build a nightstand for each of our rooms. I came up with a design and a few days later we got to work. For this project, I used 1 sheet of oak plywood (About $50 a sheet) and 1 quart of stain per nightstand. We started out by cutting the plywood down to the final dimensions (based off of the cut list in the plans) and applied the edge banding after all of the cuts were made. From here, we started the assembly process using dowel joinery. After all of the pieces were assembled, we sanded the nightstands down to a smooth finish with 220 grit sandpaper and started the finishing process. Andrew used Red Mahogany stain on his nightstand and I used Dark Walnut for mine. After the stain was dry, we added the handles to the drawers and the nightstands were all done. I'm really happy with the way both nightstands came out and had a lot of fun working with a friend in the shop this week!

If you're anything like me, then you can never find a hat when you need one. This week I set out to solve this problem once and for all. I decided to create a hat rack that didn't take up much space, but was capable of holding more hates than I could ever imagine owing. After doing a little research online, I came to this design. It has the clean design that I was looking for. I used Adobe Illustrator to design the side profiles for the hats to hang on and printed them out (available for free download). I purchased about 9' of Oak 1x4 material. I cut 2 pieces to 10.5" and 2 more at 37" long. I used my templates to cut out the side profiles and sanded all of my boards after my final cuts were made. Using dowel joinery, I glued up my boards and once the glue dried, I stained the Oak to a nice dark Ebony color. The last thing to do was mount a sawtooth picture frame hanging hanger to the back and it was ready for use.

Ep. 9 | How to Make a Coffee Mug Keurig Pod Holder